I really could go over the top here. What I've tried to do in this site is to go through all the fundamentals so that you can fully understand all the acoustic ramifications and thus be in a position where you can design your own studio. Layout of rooms etc. is really up to the basic room shapes you are starting with so instead of me sweating over my computer to give you a whole lot of inappropriate shapes I will give you the basic styles that have worked for me. If you follow the basic directions of what you need to acoustically treat each room you can take any shaped room and come up with a plan. I have not included dimensions as it is not necessary and it would obviously change for each situation. The proportions are near enough though and the angles are what make it work.

Important thing to remember are:

  • Stereo room symmetry around your speakers.
  • Glass windows or doors for communication.
  • Low-mid frequency absorption from 150 -550Hz.
  • High frequency absorption.
  • Absorption across the rear of the control room wall.
  • Whatever low frequency absorption you can fit in the space.

Things to avoid are:

  • Having to go through the studio to get to the control room!! (I hate this because you always get interuptions as people move in and out of the studio)
  • Creating studios with no visual communication. There is nothing worse than recording someone you can't see.
  • Big studios with a small pokey control room and visa versa.

So here are a few ideas that might start you off, use the selector for the different options. You can check out photos of some of the studios I've designed some of which are based on these layouts. You'll find them at my my home page. You can also check out how some of these studios have been constructed Here

THE BIG FACILITY

THE CORNER CONTROL ROOM

THE GARAGE STUDIO 1

THE GARAGE STUDIO 2

THE CONTROL ROOM

THE BEDROOM STUDIO

Take it from the top